Here’s how to find and identify moral corporations. (And anti-moral ones).

My @Quora answer to What is the most ethical U.S. corporation? http://qr.ae/7brZ89

So you’re looking for the most ethical corporations?

First we have to define “morality.” Which in human usage is a wonderfully, conveniently, nebulous term.

For me, as an atheist, and business owner, that definition of “morality” is about serving customers to make their world an easier, kinder, place while causing as little harm as possible to non customers. The key test Question here is “How would I feel if subjected to my behavior.”

There are some moral corporations, in general they’re organizations which are structured through their bylaws to be of Service to their customers and are managed by those customers. This is because there’s a structural disconnect between morals and the inherent profit motive of publicly traded corporations. When a corporation is publicly traded we lose the one check on the profit motive because the folks managing it are third partys whose only interest is profit. I’ve yet to see any large or multinational corporations which meet this test. Google, with their “Don’t be evil” did in the early days, but has since become publicly traded and has had that very human moral test overridden by the demand for profit from Wall Street.

Some examples of companies which pass that test:

Most Credit Unions.

U.S.A.A. and similar member owned, and managed, banks.

Member owned Food Cooperatives.

Many thousands of small companies across the Nation which regard their customers as friends, and treat them accordingly.

We once had law (the Clayton Act) to limit the power of the profit motive but that has pretty much been conveniently ignored by big business, Wall Street, and our government since the 1980s’.   http://lawdigitalcommons.bc.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi%3Farticle%3D2716%26context%3Dbclr&ved=0CCcQFjAB&usg=AFQjCNF0dWIQ2Hd0TpQ8BzJt9kJSRBSizQ&sig2=TqYlcGe9vm6D4izO0dy-lA

We also had law (the Sherman Antitrust Act) to enforce limitations upon Wall Street and that has been largely ignored under the obfuscation of “Consolidation = Economy of scale for customers” since the early 1990s’.

In short, if you’re looking for human scale morality in corporations, you need to limit your search to smaller companies which are directly responsible to their clients instead of being responsible to Wall Street.

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